Wednesday, 1 May 2013

Several observances of National Day of Prayer tomorrow in Dearborn, Downriver

Several observances of National Day of Prayer tomorrow in Dearborn, Downriver, A couple of churches in Dearborn are inviting people to come in Thursday to join their National Day of Prayer observances. Two city halls in nearby Downriver communities will also be hosting noon programs tomorrow as part of the 62nd annual event observed in communities nationwide.

“Christians in Dearborn are invited to gather together with us as we lift up the name of Jesus and pray for God's leading in our City and Nation,” Fairlane Alliance Church offered in announcing its National Day of Prayer observance. The event will be held at 7 p.m. at the church located on 905 Mason Street in Dearborn.

Another church in Dearborn has opened its chapel for private prayer Thursday. People are invited to use the chapel from 8 a.m.-6:30 p.m. in First Presbyterian Church of Dearborn, 600 N. Brady.

A National Day of Prayer Rally will be held from noon-1 p.m. in the Taylor City Hall Plaza, 23555 Goddard Road. Ministerial pastors from the Taylor area will be offering a procession of prayers of about three to four minutes each.

Their topics will range from offering supplications for officials of the city, state and nation; to neighborhoods and issues of morals and marriage. Also participating in the prayers will be the assistant superintendent of Taylor School District, Teresa Winnie; as well as Jeremy Waechter of the Taylor Substance Abuse Prevention Task Force, who will be offering prayer for substance abuse and broken families.

The event normally will read any presidential proclamation provided for that year's observance, and start with the police honor guard and singing of the National Anthem and “God Bless America.” Pastor Philip will follow by sharing remarks on praying for America.

The prayers will conclude with the song “God of the City.” Jack Smith and Craig Brown will be doing the music for the program, and city officials will also be offering greetings. There will also be recognition of city employees.

The sponsoring New Hope Assembly of God noted that it already holds regular prayer sessions from 9-10 a.m. Tuesday through Friday, because “We believe in God's intervention.”

Another city hall noon ceremony will be held May 2 in River Rouge. The short program, “calling all Downriver Detroiters to gather and pray for our nation” at the River Rouge City Hall, 10600 W. Jefferson Ave, is planned to run from a half hour to 45 minutes.

Gerald D. Caldwell, president of the Downriver Interdenominational Ministerial Alliance which is sponsoring the National Day of Prayer Observance, said various speakers will offer prayers on the family, unity, community, nation and the churches. A reverend of St. John African Methodist Episcopal Church, Caldwell said he has been president of the Alliance for four years, which has 30 active members among Downriver chruches in southwest Detroit, Ecorse and River Rouge.

In 1952, a joint resolution of Congress and signed by President Truman declared an annual, national day of prayer. In 1988, the law was amended and signed by President Reagan, permanently setting the first Thursday of May as the National Day of Prayer. Each year, the President signs a proclamation (and governors of the states and U.S. territories sign similar proclamations) encouraging all Americans to pray on that day.

The first mention of such a day in America's history dates back to 1775 and the Continental Congress, which called on Americans to spend the day in fasting and meditation. Presidents George Washington, John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, Andrew Jackson, and Abraham Lincoln would subsequently issue calls to prayer, the last calling for a day of “humiliation, fasting, and prayer” in 1863.

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