Monday, 6 May 2013

Cleveland Volcano blows its top, delivering rubbly lava and hot avalanche

Cleveland Volcano blows its top, delivering rubbly lava and hot avalanche, Cleveland Volcano in Alaska is acting up, according to the Associated Press via Yahoo! on May 4. Several eruptions, deemed low-level by scientists keeping an eye on the situation, have come out of the angry Aleutian Islands mountain.

Although ash from this act of Mother Nature has been held to a minimum, the spiteful volcano located less than 1,000 miles southwest of Anchorage has given up what has been dubbed "rubbly lava flow" and "hot avalanche." These harsh elements have made it all the way to the edge of the waters where the Pacific Ocean meets the Bering Sea.

Cleveland Volcano, also called Mount Cleveland, had been expected to fire up. According to the New York Daily News back in early Feb., scientists warned that this huge mound located on a remote island was "primed to erupt and spew a giant ash plume that could paralyze intercontinental travel."

Meanwhile, The Christian Science Monitor via Yahoo! compared the Cleveland Volcano episodes to that of Eyjafjallajökull, the volcano in Iceland that had air travel in Europe snarled for weeks back in 2010.

The reason for the comparison is that Cleveland Volcano exists underneath a major flight path linking North American and Asia. Even though travelers have not been very inconvenienced by these eruptions that took place on Saturday, some flights have been diverted as a result. At this point, ash cloud has reportedly reached 15,000 feet, while passenger jets typically fly at around 35,000 feet.

Stay tuned as Cleveland Volcano continues to blow its top in Alaska's Aleutian Islands.

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